What’s Happening Here? Here is the Answer!

tucker and lily (1)

On Friday I asked you what you thought was going on here, at least as best one could tell from a still photograph. I'm the first to agree it's hard to say much from one brief moment in time, but it's a great exercise nonetheless. It helps us all focus our attention and generate hypothesis about what might happen next. It would be perfectly reasonable to suggest several different scenarios... Here's the story in this case: These two dogs are great friends and play together often. The yellow dog is a 4 yr old GR/Husky cross, Tucker, who has a tendency to nip faces when he plays. The white dog in the red coat is Lily, a 2.5 yr old spayed female Dogo Argentino, owned by Katie MartzĀ  here at McC Publishing. Lily was responding to what appeared to be an inappropriate play action from Read More

A Picture’s Worth a 1,000 Words?

lilytuckerplay

Maybe not a 1,000 in this case, but what words would you put with this photo? What do you think is going on here? I'd love to hear what you all think. I know the dogs, the context and what happened before and after, so after I collect your input I'll let you in on the story. This might be a fun exercise for us to play every once in a while, yes? Let me know if you like the idea. I'll write another post on Monday and describe the dogs, their relationship and what happened immediately after the photo was taken. But before that I'd love to hear how you evaluate what you are seeing. And no fair cheating if you saw this on Facebook last week! It's just such a great photo I couldn't resist putting it out here. So... what's going on here between these two dogs? What are the most likely Read More

Anger & Anger Management

tanangry

CAN DOGS GET ANGRY? Yup, I'm here to say that they can. Do they get angry as often as humans? Nope, and thank heavens for that. If they did, I doubt we'd live with them, given that they have carpet knives in their mouths. Just like people, they vary tremendously in how often they experience or express anger. I've known some dogs who appeared not to have an angry moment their entire lives. More commonly, I've worked with dogs who, on occasion, are clearly frustrated at not getting what they wanted or expected. And rarely, I've worked with a small number of dogs who appeared to live in a state of 'road rage' for weeks, months or years on end. So even though I would never say that anger in dogs is an exact replica of anger in people, both in its frequency and how we experience it, it is a Read More

Dog-Dog Reactivity – Treatment Summary

redford in fall sun 9-10

The seminar in Seattle was great fun, lots of good folksĀ  and excellent questions from the audience. In the morning I talked about treatment for dog-dog reactivity, and I promised a summary of that on the blog. Here it is, with the obligatory caution that the morning itself wasn't close to enough time to cover the topic in depth, so the summary here will be chapter titles (but hopefully helpful ones). Knowing that I couldn't possibly talk about how to handle every type of case, here are some highlights: REACTIVITY? What are we talking about here? When I use the term I am talking about what we usually think of as "over reactivity," or "reactivity" that we see as inappropriate. After all, a loose body greeting is a "reaction" to another dog, right? In this case, I am talking about Read More

Great Article on Dog-Dog Aggression

turkey 1

Have you seen the latest issue of The APDT Chronicle? It has a fantastic article by Suzanne Hetts and Daniel Estep (both CAAB & Ph.D) titled Safety and Ethics in Working with Dog-to-Dog Aggression. Anyone who treats dog-dog aggression, or who has a dog who might have that problem would do well to read it. (And to stay tuned, Chronicle will have more articles on dog-dog aggression in several issues to follow--Pia Silvani and I are writing one together for an upcoming issue.) One of the important points they make is that dog-dog aggression is often not taken as seriously as aggression toward humans, and yet, it can have horrific effects on both species. No one knows better than they: their Dalmation and Irish Setter were brutally attacked by a loose dog last year, and were only saved Read More